Blogs Posts from the Anglican Indigenous Network

Archbishop Brown Turei to resign

6 September 2016

Archbishop Brown Turei to resign

Archbishop Brown Turei has announced his intention to retire after more than 65 years in ordained ministry.

He will resign as Bishop of Tairawhiti at the end of this year, and as Bishop of Aotearoa – leader of the Maori arm of the Anglican Church – from the end of March next year.

He has planned his resignation in two stages, he says, “to allow Tairāwhiti and Waipounamu to elect new Bishops and have full representation in place before the election for a new Bishop of Aotearoa is convened.

The full article can be found here


St John's pilots leadership scheme

8 August 2016

St John's pilots leadership scheme

St John’s College today welcomed a mid-year intake of students – and formally launched a pilot leadership development programme for its new Tikanga Maori students.

The five new students welcomed today have set sail on a 19-week (one semester) leadership development programme, devised and overseen by the Dean of Tikanga Maori, Rev Katene Eruera.

The idea is that once they’ve completed that, they’ll continue with an academic programme. Most of the new students are heading down the ordination track.

The full article can be found here


Environmentalists say the Trans-Pacific Partnership is their worst nightmare

8 February 2016

Environmentalists say the Trans-Pacific Partnership is their worst nightmare

Research project shines light on Beothuk-Anglican relations – Part I

4 February 2016

Research project shines light on Beothuk-Anglican relations – Part I

[Anglican Church of Canada by Matt Gardner] Alongside the legacy of cultural genocide against the Indigenous peoples of Canada, embodied in the residential school system, is the tragic history of what some scholars consider to be a case of full-fledged genocide. The Beothuk, the Indigenous people of Newfoundland, were declared extinct in 1829 following the death of their last known living member, Shanawdithit. The annihilation of a people due to starvation, disease, violence and competition for resources, and the loss of virtually their entire culture, followed centuries of encroachment by European settlers.

In 1819, an armed band of men journeyed into central Newfoundland seeking a Beothuk group accused of stealing their property. During the resulting skirmish, several Beothuk people were killed, including Nonosabasut, the man believed to be the chief of the tribe.

His wife, Demasduit, was captured and brought to the town of Twillingate. There she was put in the care of the Rev. John Leigh, an Anglican priest and missionary who in 1816 had become the area’s first resident clergyman and who voiced concerns about the treatment of the Beothuk.

The full article can be found here

[photo.The Rev. Dr. Joanne Mercer, rector of the Parish of Twillingate, stands beside Gerald Squires' statue "The Spirit of the Beothuk" in Boyd's Cove, Nfld. The statue depicts Shanawdithit, the last known living member of the Beothuk people.]


Aboriginal Brass Band Offers Burst of Hope in a Bleak Community

3 February 2016

Aboriginal Brass Band Offers Burst of Hope in a Bleak Community

[By YARRABAH, Australia — This remote stretch of coastline in north Queensland has much to offer: pristine beaches dotted with mango and palm trees, tropical breezes, an azure ocean.

But the lush surroundings belie a troubled history. Yarrabah was settled as an Anglican mission in the 1890s, and Aboriginal and some South Sea island natives were forcibly relocated here from their traditional lands. Under mission rule, they toiled in agriculture, working on sugar and coffee plantations, for meager rations.

Children were separated from their parents and sent to church-run dormitories, their native languages banned and their freedom of movement curtailed and the Aboriginal community still struggles with this grim history.

The full article can be found here


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