Blogs Posts from the Anglican Indigenous Network

Indigenous Anglican church could help Canada find its spiritual voice, Sacred Circle hears

21 August 2018

Indigenous Anglican church could help Canada find its spiritual voice, Sacred Circle hears

[Anglican Journal, by BY Tali Folkins] A self-determining Indigenous church could bring new spiritual life not just to Canada’s Indigenous Anglicans, but to the country as a whole, Anglican priest and psychologist Canon Martin Brokenleg said in an address to Sacred Circle August 7.

“The strength of Indigenous cultures is our spirituality. We speak easily about the remarkable spiritual experiences we have and the dreams and visions that are given to us,” he said.

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Strengthening links in Te Ao Māori

20 August 2018

Strengthening links in Te Ao Maori

[Anglican Taonga] The Anglican Church in Aotearoa New Zealand and Polynesia is stepping up to honour the achievements of the Kingitanga (Māori King movement), the Ringatū and Rātana churches in 2018 as each celebrates a significant anniversary.

The General Synod Standing Committee has ratified a motion brought by Tikanga Māori to enliven ties with the three movements in this year when: the Kingitanga commemorates 160 years since the coronation of Pōtatau Te Wherowhero as the first Māori King; the Ringatū Church marks 150 years since its founder Te Kooti Arikirangi Te Turuki first offered prayers at Whareongaonga, and the Rātana Church celebrates 100 years since its founder, Te Māngai, Tahupōtiki Wiremu Rātana received his calling to a ministry of healing.

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MacDonald calls for discipleship as heart of future Indigenous church

9 August 2018

MacDonald calls for discipleship as heart of future Indigenous church

[Anglican Journal, by Tali Folkins] If an Indigenous expression of the Anglican Church of Canada is to be effective, it will be by putting Jesus at the centre of everything it does, and creating disciples rather than mere church members, National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald told the ninth Indigenous Anglican Sacred Circle Wednesday, August 8.

“We beseech you in the name of our living God, in the power of his word made flesh, in the power of the Holy Spirit, that you give your minds and hearts to discipleship, and that you follow him as a disciple,” MacDonald told the gathering, which is meeting in Prince George this week, August 6-11. “This is, I think, the way that we begin to make a difference in our communities.”

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Sacred Circle ponders principles of future Indigenous church

8 August 2018

Sacred Circle ponders principles of future Indigenous church

[Anglican Journal, by Tali Folkins] Indigenous Canadian Anglicans inched closer to having a spiritual organization of their own Tuesday, August 7, as the ninth Indigenous Anglican Sacred Circle, meeting in Prince George, B.C., August 6-11, pondered a document proposing guiding principles for the future church.

Sacred Circle, the national decision-making body of Indigenous Canadian Anglicans that meets every three years, was presented with the document, “An Indigenous Spiritual Movement: Becoming What God Intends Us To Be,” by National Indigenous Anglican Bishop Mark MacDonald. MacDonald said he had drafted the document, with revisions from other Canadian Indigenous Anglican leaders, and was presenting it to the Sacred Circle “not as something that is finished, but something that we look for your wisdom and guidance on.” Members of the assembly were asked to break up into smaller groups and present their comments.

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New Pihopa o Aotearoa named

7 March 2018

New Pihopa o Aotearoa named

The Archbishops have announced the election of the Rt Rev Don Tamihere as the next Pihopa o Aotearoa, or leader of the Maori Anglican Church.

Bishop Don, who is 45, and who has Ngati Porou ties, now succeeds the late Archbishop Brown Turei not only as Anglican Bishop of Te Tairawhiti, the tribal district which covers the eastern seaboard of the North Island, but also as Pihopa Mataamua, leader of Te Pihopatanga and co-leader of the three tikanga church.

The two sitting archbishops, the Most Revs Philip Richardson and Winston Halapua, are delighted that Bishop Don has been chosen:

"We rejoice with the people of Te Pihopatanga o Aotearoa," they say, "and look forward to sharing the primacy of our church with Bishop Don”.

The full article can be found here


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