Blogs Posts from the Anglican Indigenous Network

Kāi Tahu bishop for the south

8 October 2016

Kāi Tahu bishop for the south

Bishop of Aotearoa, Archbishop Brown Turei has announced the Ven Richard Rangi Wallace (QSM) has been elected Bishop of Te Waipounamu.

Electors from the Anglican Maori Diocese of Te Wai Pounamu gathered in Christchurch from September 23-25, where they nominated Archdeacon Richard Wallace as successor to the late Bishop John Gray.

The full article can be found here

 

 


Archbishop Brown Turei to resign

6 September 2016

Archbishop Brown Turei to resign

Archbishop Brown Turei has announced his intention to retire after more than 65 years in ordained ministry.

He will resign as Bishop of Tairawhiti at the end of this year, and as Bishop of Aotearoa – leader of the Maori arm of the Anglican Church – from the end of March next year.

He has planned his resignation in two stages, he says, “to allow Tairāwhiti and Waipounamu to elect new Bishops and have full representation in place before the election for a new Bishop of Aotearoa is convened.

The full article can be found here


St John's pilots leadership scheme

8 August 2016

St John's pilots leadership scheme

St John’s College today welcomed a mid-year intake of students – and formally launched a pilot leadership development programme for its new Tikanga Maori students.

The five new students welcomed today have set sail on a 19-week (one semester) leadership development programme, devised and overseen by the Dean of Tikanga Maori, Rev Katene Eruera.

The idea is that once they’ve completed that, they’ll continue with an academic programme. Most of the new students are heading down the ordination track.

The full article can be found here


Environmentalists say the Trans-Pacific Partnership is their worst nightmare

8 February 2016

Environmentalists say the Trans-Pacific Partnership is their worst nightmare

Bibles to replace booze at Gisborne annual music festival

30 September 2015

Bibles to replace booze at Gisborne annual music festival

An annual Gisborne festival that last year erupted into a three-hour riot looks set to be replaced by an  alcohol-free gospel version.

Gisborne District Council approved on Thursday a plan to hold the four-day Gospel Roots Tairawhiti Music and Arts Festival at the Awapuni Stadium and nearby campgrounds.

The venue had been home to the annual BW Summer Festival, from 2007 to 2014.

Last year the festival ended in a riot where more than 63 people were arrested and 83 injured.

During a three-hour battle with police a mob of drunken campers set fires, overturned vehicles, hurled objects at police and security guards, and wrecked the campsite.

The new Christian-based festival will be far less riotous, with organisers saying they will not tolerate drinking, smoking, aggressive dancing, stage diving or crowd surfing.

The festival, run by the Gospel Roots Charitable Trust, is an initiative of the Maori Anglican Church in Tairawhiti, and the Anglican Diocese of Waiapu.

The full article can be found here


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