Blogs Posts from the Anglican Indigenous Network

Kāi Tahu bishop for the south

8 October 2016

Kāi Tahu bishop for the south

Bishop of Aotearoa, Archbishop Brown Turei has announced the Ven Richard Rangi Wallace (QSM) has been elected Bishop of Te Waipounamu.

Electors from the Anglican Maori Diocese of Te Wai Pounamu gathered in Christchurch from September 23-25, where they nominated Archdeacon Richard Wallace as successor to the late Bishop John Gray.

The full article can be found here

 

 


Archbishop Brown Turei to resign

6 September 2016

Archbishop Brown Turei to resign

Archbishop Brown Turei has announced his intention to retire after more than 65 years in ordained ministry.

He will resign as Bishop of Tairawhiti at the end of this year, and as Bishop of Aotearoa – leader of the Maori arm of the Anglican Church – from the end of March next year.

He has planned his resignation in two stages, he says, “to allow Tairāwhiti and Waipounamu to elect new Bishops and have full representation in place before the election for a new Bishop of Aotearoa is convened.

The full article can be found here


St John's pilots leadership scheme

8 August 2016

St John's pilots leadership scheme

St John’s College today welcomed a mid-year intake of students – and formally launched a pilot leadership development programme for its new Tikanga Maori students.

The five new students welcomed today have set sail on a 19-week (one semester) leadership development programme, devised and overseen by the Dean of Tikanga Maori, Rev Katene Eruera.

The idea is that once they’ve completed that, they’ll continue with an academic programme. Most of the new students are heading down the ordination track.

The full article can be found here


Manhattan mission accomplished

5 May 2015

Manhattan mission accomplished

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The last of a small delegation of Kiwi Anglicans who’ve been in New York speaking up for the concerns of indigenous people – both within the Communion and the world at large – are returning this week to Aotearoa New Zealand.

Bishop Kito Pikaahu led a delegation of seven from Te Pihopatanga to the biennial Anglican Indigenous Network (AIN) conference which was held in The Big Apple from April 14-18.

And on April 14, the eve of that conference, the Pihopatanga team met with the person who is, arguably, the most significant Kiwi on the world stage – former Prime Minister Helen Clark, who took time out from her tasks as Head of the United Nations Development Programme to welcome them to the United Nations headquarters in New York.

The delegation briefed Ms Clark on the purpose of the AIN conference – and spoke of its significance in strengthening people-to-people links among indigenous Anglicans throughout the Communion.

Later that same day, the delegation (which included former diplomat turned St John’s College ordinand Kerry Davis) also met with New Zealand’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations, the former Deputy Prime Minister, Jim McLay.

The full article can be found here


'Let's put paid to this belief that we were colonised by Christianity'

6 February 2015

When I was a university student… a number of Maori were arguing that we were colonised by Christianity: that these (foreign) thoughts were put in our head.

I want to say… that I do not believe that that was the case, at all.

The Christian message had a natural appeal to Maori – and Maori were active in seeking it out and promoting it themselves.

Let me refer, then, to Ruatara. Ruatara went over to London to hunt out what it was that gave strength to the British people.

He came to the view that it was their spirituality and their religion.

He went to Australia to hunt out someone who could bring that message to New Zealand, and brought over Marsden.

The full article can be found here


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