Blogs Posts from the Anglican Indigenous Network

New Pihopa o Aotearoa named

7 March 2018

New Pihopa o Aotearoa named

The Archbishops have announced the election of the Rt Rev Don Tamihere as the next Pihopa o Aotearoa, or leader of the Maori Anglican Church.

Bishop Don, who is 45, and who has Ngati Porou ties, now succeeds the late Archbishop Brown Turei not only as Anglican Bishop of Te Tairawhiti, the tribal district which covers the eastern seaboard of the North Island, but also as Pihopa Mataamua, leader of Te Pihopatanga and co-leader of the three tikanga church.

The two sitting archbishops, the Most Revs Philip Richardson and Winston Halapua, are delighted that Bishop Don has been chosen:

"We rejoice with the people of Te Pihopatanga o Aotearoa," they say, "and look forward to sharing the primacy of our church with Bishop Don”.

The full article can be found here


Spiritual struggle, systemic evil

5 March 2018

Spiritual struggle, systemic evil

[Bishop Mark McDonald Anglcain Journal] The recent acquittal of Gerald Stanley in the death of Colten Boushie has revealed a deep and abiding difference in the experience of Indigenous peoples and non-Indigenous people across Canada. For many Indigenous people, this was both heartbreaking and familiar. For many other Canadians, there was both dismay and some surprise. The enormous gaps in the performance of justice, the widespread and obvious denial of basic respect and dignity for Indigenous people in the legal system, have become clear in a way that is a sharp jolt to a broader public.

Many of the responses to the verdict have been useful and good; Senator Murray Sinclair’s comments stand out as practical, wise and constructive. While holding onto these practical steps forward, it is very important to recognize some of the deep truths this matter reveals. The deep and wide presence of systemic evil in Canadian society and culture has become clear to a larger group of Canadians. Recognizing this, may we perceive that there is no healthy way forward for Canada without an effective dismantling of the systemic evil we call racism.

The conscious attitudes of individuals are where most people locate racism. For significant parts of Canadian society, therefore, outright prejudice against Indigenous people is no longer accepted in polite conversation and behavior. But, the systemic nature of racism is revealed in that long after direct statements of prejudice are rejected, bias and fear of “the other” are still embedded in all the various structures and institutions of our society—including the institution of the church. Sadly, and with deadly impact, bias and fear of the other linger in the hidden and habitual attitudes of great portions of our society.

The full article can be found here

 


Primate urges prayers, action in the wake of Colten Boushie case

28 February 2018

Primate urges prayers, action in the wake of Colten Boushie case

[Anglican Journal by Joelle Kidd] Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, is calling on people of faith to pray for those affected by the shooting death of Colten Boushie, an Indigenous young man, and the subsequent trial and acquittal of Gerald Stanley, the Saskatchewan farmer accused of killing him. Hiltz also sought prayers for “the needs for reform in the justice system.”

“With great empathy, we especially remember the Boushie family and Red Pheasant First Nation,” said Hiltz, in a statement released February 21.

The statement also encourages people of faith to respond through action. “We encourage you to attend or organize public events in your community. They could be opportunities for listening, learning, advocacy, and action concerning human rights, racism, and justice.”

Boushie, a 22-year-old Cree man, was fatally shot Aug. 9, 2016, after he and four others drove onto Stanley’s cattle farm near Biggar, Sask. Stanley testified that the shot was accidental and possibly due to a malfunction known as a hang fire. On Feb. 9, 2018, a Saskatchewan jury found him not guilty of second-degree murder.

The full article can be found here


Kāi Tahu bishop for the south

8 October 2016

Kāi Tahu bishop for the south

Bishop of Aotearoa, Archbishop Brown Turei has announced the Ven Richard Rangi Wallace (QSM) has been elected Bishop of Te Waipounamu.

Electors from the Anglican Maori Diocese of Te Wai Pounamu gathered in Christchurch from September 23-25, where they nominated Archdeacon Richard Wallace as successor to the late Bishop John Gray.

The full article can be found here

 

 


Anglican Church of Canada Resolution Corporation return bolsters Inuit ministry in Montreal

8 September 2016

Anglican Church of Canada Resolution Corporation return bolsters Inuit ministry in Montreal

In February 2015, the Anglican Diocese of Montreal hired a diocesan-sponsored clergyperson to focus exclusively on Indigenous ministries. Originally from the northern Quebec community of Kuujjuarapik in the Diocese of the Arctic, the Rev. Annie Ittoshat brings a strong cultural and professional background to her position as Aboriginal Community Minister. Her newly-created position offers a particular focus on ministry to the large population of Inuit in Montreal who have come from northern communities for employment opportunities, social services, or to seek medical treatment.

The full article can be found here

[Photo: The Rev. Annie Ittoshat currently serves as Aboriginal community minister for the Diocese of Montreal. Submitted photo by Janet Best]


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