Blogs Posts from the Anglican Indigenous Network

'To achieve full maturity in Christ'

14 August 2015

'To achieve full maturity in Christ'

[AnglicanTaonga] Friday’s Te Runanganui session commenced with worship and eucharist led by Te Manawa o te Wheke (central North Island). This was followed by Bible study presented by Reverend Katene Eruera, Dean of Tikanga Māori, St John’s Theological College.

Whakarongo ki te kupu a te Wairua ki te Haahi - Hear what the Spirit is saying to the Church.

The full article can be found here

 


Bishop of Aotearoa Calls for Laity Voice to be heard

13 August 2015

Bishop of Aotearoa Calls for Laity Voice to be heard

One hundred and Sixty delegates, observers and guests from around Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia were warmly welcomed on 6 August with a powhiri (welcome) to the 2015 Te Runanganui o Te Pihopatanga o Aotearoa (The Maori General Synod of New Zealand) being held at the Amora Hotel, Wellington.  Te Runanganui o Te Pihopatanga o Aotearoa encompasses five regional Hui Amorangi (Dioceses) located across New Zealand, and meets biennially.  Hosted by Te Hui Amorangi o Te Upoko o Te Ika (Diocese encompassing the central and lower western region of the North Island) this year’s powhiri speakers included Reverend Don Rangi, Reverend Bill Tangohau, Professor Hirini Mead on behalf of the hau kainga (home people) conveying a message of welcome in the hope that the conference continues the vision of Te Pihopatanga as a means of “responding to God’s call to serve the people - Te karanga a te Atua ki te kauwhau me te kawe i te rongopai ki tona iwi.”

The full article can be found here


Laity vital to Pihopatanga growth

13 August 2015

Laity vital to Pihopatanga growth

[AnglicanTaonga] Amongst calls being made for the New Zealand flag to remain and a motion for a Bishop's age of retirement overturned, a profound theme threading its way through this year’s Te Runanganui was that the voice of laity be heard in support of its clergy.

For Te Pihopatanga to grow the Church, laity must step up and take control of the administration side of the Church, freeing clergy up to get on with their core business of worship.

“Minita a Whanau” and education were key points in strategic planning discussions throughout the weekend which continued on the theme for laity to become involved in supporting clergy in their own wider communities with the Church, recognising the wider whānau of the Church as being its backbone. 

Archbishop Brown Turei chaired Te Runanganui with humility and wisdom providing guidance and impetus throughout the programme.

The full article can be found here


Anglican Church pledges financial support for wildfire relief

9 July 2015

Anglican Church pledges financial support for wildfire relief

The Anglican Church of Canada has announced financial support for the Saskatchewan wildfire relief efforts. Financial donations will be used to provide care for the more than 12,000 evacuees.
 
On behalf of the General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada, the Most Rev. Fred Hiltz, Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, has pledged $5,000 to Diocesan Indigenous Bishop of Missinipi Adam Halkett and to Diocesan Bishop of Saskatchewan Michael Hawkins who are providing on-the-ground support.
 
The Primate’s World Relief and Development Fund has also pledged $15,000 to the Prince Albert Grand Council (PAGC). Meanwhile, the Anglican Foundation has pledged $5,000 in aid to the diocese of Saskatchewan.
 
“The donations are a sign of our love and support for Bishop Michael and Bishop Adam, and all those dear and faithful who are reaching out to those who have been evacuated,” Archbishop Hiltz said. “This is a very difficult time and we continue to pray for everyone affected by these fires.”
 
On Wednesday, July 8, Bishop Hawkins and Bishop Halkett were scheduled to have a conference call with Saskatchewan clergy to provide an update on donations and how they will be spent.
 
Bishop Halkett—who lives in the community of Montreal Lake Cree Nation, which has come under threat from the fire—said their hope was to try and help families in need.
 
“It’ll probably be focused on the evacuees, because some of my community members lost houses in Montreal Lake … Some of them are homeless now because of that,” he said.
 
Providing an update on relief efforts, Bishop Halkett said that the situation was becoming more stressful, as evacuees wanting to return home were still unable to do so because of safety concerns.
 
“They didn’t allow anybody to go in [to Montreal Lake] yesterday or the day before, because of the thick smoke and also the fear of the fire flaring up again,” he said.
 
He expressed his gratitude for the church’s financial donation.
 
“We’re very glad to receive any kind of donations from anyone, especially the General Synod … I’m very grateful on behalf of all the evacuees in Saskatchewan, because I pretty well oversee all of northern Saskatchewan, so I can relate to what their appreciation is for that.”
 
“The support that we’ve received, both in terms of prayer and finances, has been overwhelming,” Bishop Hawkins added.
 
“There’s really been a sense of solidarity. We talk in the diocese of Saskatchewan about being mamuwe, which is Cree for ‘together,’ and there’s a real sense that Anglicans across the country are together with our folks in this crisis.”


Reclaiming our humanity - Bishop Mark MacDonald

9 June 2015

Reclaiming our humanity - Bishop Mark MacDonald

[WCC] We are entering an era in which the public has a broader awareness of the rights of indigenous peoples, said Bishop Mark MacDonald, WCC president for North America and the National Indigenous Bishop of the Anglican Church of Canada.

The full article can be found here

 


Archive